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Sri Lankan tea from China to Ceylon : Finding tea was a coincidence. There is a legend that the Chinese emperor was boiling water over a fire when a few leaves of the plant Camellia sinensis fell into a pot of hot water. The emperor drank this drink and found that it gives him physical strength, satisfaction of mind and will. Thus was created the belief in the mysterious healing power of tea, and tea is still popular as a healthy soothing drink.

The first book on tea (Cha Qing) was written centuries later in 780 AD by the Chinese poet Lu Yu. This included a description of the cultivation, preparation and consumption of tea.

Sri Lankan tea from China to Ceylon

Commercial tea cultivation spread through China and Japan in the eighth century, where it was considered a luxury, but was enjoyed by Japanese aristocrats and holy men. Pure Ceylon tea is synonymous with quality tea, which is welcomed by tea lovers around the world. From 1824, when the British brought a tea plant from China, Sri Lanka or Ceylon became one of the most well-known and popular teas in the world.

Sri Lanka has a long history of producing excellent teas since 1867. The perfect humidity, cool breeze, and ideal rainfall in the central highlands of the country provide a climate that enhances the production of quality tea. Due to geographical differences, each region produces tea with different flavors, aromas and colors, which results in a wide range of different grades of tea produced.

“High grown” is currently known as the best grade of tea produced in Sri Lanka and its name is derived from the high altitudes. The reason for its quality is the humid climate, abundant sunshine and well-drained soils that provide excellent conditions for tea cultivation.

Sri Lankan tea is also grown at lower altitudes. Tea plantations are found throughout central and southern areas such as Sabragamuwa, Ratnapura and even in Galle. The tea plantations that are small in this area are surrounded by beautiful vegetation. While the teas produced here are known as “low grown”, they are not of low quality and are in high demand in the country’s tea auctions.

There are hundreds of different types of tea around the world due to the high level of adaptation of the tea plant to different types of climate and land. Finding tea plantations in tropical countries such as India and Sri Lanka – to temperate regions such as the United States and Canada due to differences in climate, rainfall and processing conditions, the four main types of white, black, green and oolong tea can offer a range of interesting flavors for Tea enthusiasts.

What started out as a medicinal drink years ago is now essential for evening gatherings and other entertainment. In addition to instantly refreshing and awakening your senses, the caffeine in tea help improve memory function, lower cholesterol, reduce cancerous tumors, boost immunity to viral infections, and eliminate excess belly fat. Tea contains many important vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that are essential for good health. That is why tea has been used as a medicine for many years and is still used for this reason with the support of modern research. Drinking tea is associated with oral health and the prevention of some cancers and heart disease.

Useful properties of tea : Antioxidants

The antioxidants in our diet prevent free radical attacks. Vitamins A, C and E are popular antioxidants. Both green and black tea contain antioxidants called flavonoids, which play an important role in protecting us against heart disease and cancer.

Black tea contains vitamins, each of which has a unique important function for maintaining health, including:

Carotene: The precursor of vitamin A (retinol) acts as an antioxidant

Thiamine: (B1) and riboflavin (B2): Both play an important role in the release of food energy.

Vitamin C: – It is important in maintaining a healthy immune system. An antioxidant that helps detoxify and acts as a structural component in gum collagen fibers.

Folic acid Pantothenic: Involved in cell division and amino acid synthesis.

Nicotinic acid and pantothenic acid:Important for the release of energy from carbohydrates and fats.

minerals / Tea is also a rich source of three very important minerals

Manganese: An adjuvant to an enzyme that prevents oxidative damage. Drinking several cups of tea a day can provide almost half of your daily manganese needs.

Potassium: is one of the main electrolytes in the body and therefore plays an important role in water balance as well as acid and base balance of the body. Potassium is also essential for the transmission of nerve impulses. Deficiency leads to ectopic heartbeat, fatigue and localized cramps.

Fluoride: Another mineral that is found in abundance in tea. In fact, tea is one of the few natural sources of fluoride. Fluoride has been shown to be the most successful agent against tooth decay. Scientists encourage drinking tea to improve oral health and prevent tooth and gum decay.

Sri Lankan tea from China to Ceylon